jueves, 4 de mayo de 2017

#ShowTheEvidence #Edtech Efficacy #Research Academic Symposium. 3-4 Mayo 2017 -Washington, DC


Hoy traemos a este espacio el Symposium que se está celebrando del 3 y 4 de Mayo en Washington, DC #ShowTheEvidence #Edtech Efficacy research Academic Symposium. ... Building a Movement Around Research, Impact in EdTech
EdTech Efficacy Research
Academic Symposium
In Washington, D.C. on May 3 and 4, 2017, the University of Virginia’s Curry School of Education, Digital Promise, and the Jefferson Education Accelerator will host a symposium focused on the role of efficacy research in the development, adoption, and implementation of educational technology. The symposium represents the culmination of a year-long collaboration among stakeholders that rarely collaborate in support of education technology: academic researchers; entrepreneurs; district and university leaders; investors and philanthropists; and teachers and professors. Our work is motivated by a belief that technology has massive, unmet potential to improve student outcomes across K-12 and postsecondary education. Collaboration is the first step in developing a lexicon centered on efficacy. And a more uniform understanding of efficacy can help solutions that actually work take hold and scale. Together our goal is to move efficacy to the center of the discourse concerning the development, adoption, and implementation of technology in education and, in doing so, create pathways for innovations that work to scale and make an impact.

Symposium Overview
For too long, education technology decision-making has been driven by marketing rather than merit. Investors, entrepreneurs – and, all too often educators – mistake scale for impact. We assume popular solutions have tapped into a fundamental need—and that they work to produce the results we want. And yet, there is precious little evidence that presents how and when technology impacts teaching or learning. And much of the research that purports to inform policy or practice fails to consider the diversity and complexity of educational institutions and school districts, classrooms and lecture halls. Gathering real evidence may not be easy. It may be expensive. But it is undoubtedly possible. And we owe it to our teachers, our students, and ourselves to ask informed questions and deliver the answers.
Education technology presents possibilities that have drawn attention from some of our brightest entrepreneurs. Investors and philanthropists support, and are working to scale, these new ideas and opportunities. Researchers are beginning to pay attention to ed tech trends and, occasionally, explore the efficacy of ed tech products and services. We could be entering a new era, in which data informs administrative – and instructional – decision making more than ever. In which faculty and teacher-consumers challenge the dominance of the central office in ed tech procurement. In which technology provides parents with unprecedented visibility into the classroom and, for better or worse, policymakers take note.
Big questions remain: Will technology catapult us forward or deeply distract us from our mission?
The University of Virginia’s Curry School of Education, Digital Promise, and the Jefferson Education Accelerator are hosting an Academic Symposium on Education Technology Efficacy on May 3-4, 2017 that will bring together key stakeholders to examine more critically what’s working in education technology, and consider the role and relevance of efficacy research in enabling its promise. With the shared mission of educating ourselves and understanding what works to advance teaching and learning, we aim to elevate the ed tech conversation beyond its focus on scale and start talking about impact. We hope that our work will help entrepreneurs understand where to devote their energies and resources. We hope to cultivate the interests of school divisions and higher education institutions in asking for evidence of impact when they make procurement decisions. We hope to provide investors with the tools to use evidence to inform allocations of capital. We hope to inspire researchers willing to consider the role that technology can play in the future of education. And we hope that we can help professors, teachers, and leaders better understand how to leverage technology to drive outcomes for students.
But all of this depends upon an open, candid dialogue among interested parties. To achieve this, we’re inviting stakeholders who are researchers, entrepreneurs, university and school district leaders, investors and philanthropists, and teachers and professors, to join our Working Groups. Each Working Group will benefit from resources and support to explore a series of tough questions that influence, stymie, benefit, or shape the future of efficacy research on education technology. We’ve designed the Working Groups to bring together diverse stakeholders that don’t often collaborate with the goal of generating insights that will be relevant and hard-hitting.
Technology can be a transformative force in education. But it will never achieve that aim if scale is allowed to be a proxy for impact. We must demand better information about the efficacy of our solutions. Join us as we work to move the conversation beyond popularity to proof.
Estos son los grupos de trabajo :
SYMPOSIUM WORKING GROUPS
Symposium Working Groups provide the opportunity for active, ongoing collaboration among stakeholders from across the spectrum. Together, they are collaborating to identify barriers, tackle complex challenges, and generate new insights to advance the field of EdTech research and evaluation in ways that make a difference — and move the needle on outcomes. Get engaged with the Working Groups by providing your feedback and ideas to the members.


Working Group A
The Role of Research in K12 District Decision-Making

WORKING GROUP LEADERS:

Hal Friedlander
Hal Friedlander
CEO, Technology for Education Consortium
Aubrey Francisco
Aubrey Francisco
Research Director, Digital Promise

Working Group B
The Role of Research in Higher Ed Decision-Making

WORKING GROUP LEADER:

Fiona Hollands
Fiona Hollands
Associate Director and Senior Researcher, Center for Benefit-Cost Studies of Education, Teachers College, Columbia University

Working Group C
Research Spending & the Most Popular EdTech Products

WORKING GROUP LEADERS:

John Hutton
John Hutton
Superintendent, Gurnee School District 56 (IL)
Ann Flynn
Ann Flynn
Director of Education Technology, National School Boards Association

Working Group D
Evidence and Quality of Efficacy in Research Approaches

WORKING GROUP LEADER:

Mahnaz R. Charania
Mahnaz R. Charania
Director, Strategic Planning & Evaluation, Fulton County Schools (GA)
David Daniel
David Daniel
Professor, Dept of Psychology, James Madison University

Working Group E
Institutional Competence in Evaluating Efficacy Research

WORKING GROUP LEADERS:

Robert C. Pianta
Robert C. Pianta
Dean, Curry School of Education, University of Virginia
Benjamin Riley
Benjamin Riley
Executive Director, Deans for Impact

Working Group F
Investors & Entrepreneurs

WORKING GROUP LEADER:

Susan Fuhrman
Susan Fuhrman
President, Teachers College, Columbia University

Working Group G
The Goals and Roles of Federal Funding for EdTech Research

WORKING GROUP LEADERS:

Steven Hodas
Steven Hodas
Innovation Cluster Sr Advisor, Digital Promise
Craig Dane Roberts
Craig Dane Roberts
Director Duke University

Working Group H
Education Philanthropies

WORKING GROUP LEADER:

Edith Gummer
Edith Gummer
Director, Education Research, Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation

Working Group I
EdTech User Voice

WORKING GROUP LEADER:

Adam Stephens
Adam Stephens
Officer of Advanced Academics, Houston ISD (TX)


Working Group J
Crowdsourcing Efficacy Research and Product Reviews

WORKING GROUP LEADERS:

Chris Rush
Chris Rush
Co-founder & Chief Program Officer, New Classrooms
Bart Epstein
Bart Epstein
Founding CEO, Jefferson Education Accelerator; University of Virginia Curry School of Education




Tambien traemos este artículo titulado #ShowTheEvidence: Building a Movement Around Research, Impact in EdTech;
 que comienza así :

This is the first in a series of essays surrounding the EdTech Efficacy Research Symposium, a gathering of 275 researchers, teachers, entrepreneurs, professors, administrators, and philanthropists to discuss the role efficacy research should play in guiding the development and implementation of education technologies. This series was produced in partnership with Pearson, a co-sponsor of the symposium co-hosted by the University of Virginia’s Curry School of Education, Digital Promise, and the Jefferson Education Accelerator.
To improve education in America, we must improve how we develop and use education technology.
Teachers and students are increasingly using digital tools and platforms to support learning inside and outside the classroom every day. There are 3.6 million teachers using edtech, and approximately one in four college students take online courses — four times as many as a decade earlier. Technology will impact the 74 million children currently under the age of 18 as they progress through the pre-K–12 education system. The key question is: What can we do to make sure that the education technology being developed and deployed today fits the needs of 21st-century learners?
Our teachers and students deserve high-quality tools that provide evidence of student learning, and that provide the right kind of evidence — evidence that can tell us whether the tool is influencing the intended learning outcomes.
(The 74: After Six Years, Brooklyn’s P-TECH to Graduate First Class as the Model Expands Worldwide)
(leer más...)

 Fuente: [symposium ]

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